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Paul Five CdPaul Five
The Poetry Of Drugs And Promiscuous Sex (Serosun)

 

 

 

A solo slice from the man who put the crazed guitar over Synthetic's electronics, this album sees Paul Five reinvent himself as a kind of guttersnipe rock 'n' roll troubadour, a one-man Rolling Stones - 70s style, of course, before they started doing AOR aerobics sountrack music. The sound of a full band pieced together and produced by Mr Five himself, the ruling noise here is low-slung low fi, a rackety rampage through some classic rock themes. When I tell you that the song titles here include such gems as 'Dirty And Raw', 'Flesh Trash Heat' and 'Freakshow', you'll immediately twig where we are - a sleazoid rock 'n' roll bar on the side of town you wouldn't want to visit alone after dark.

Thumping drumbeats and splendidly distorted guitar drive it all along, over which Paul gives it an authentic rock caterwaul. It's neatly done - he effortlessly conjures up the impression of a bunch of leather-clad reprobates largin' it in the aforementioned sleazoid bar. You can almost smell the spilled beer and hot valves in the amps. In a way, the conceptual side of this project - the fact that it's the sound of a virtual band created by one person - gives this CD an extra dimension of interest. If it really was done by a sleazy rock band, maybe it wouldn't be quite such a grabber. There is, after all, no shortage of sleazy rock bands on this planet. But the one-man troubadour angle is a neat idea: it's as if Billy Bragg had grown up listening to the New York Dolls instead of The Clash. Virtually constructed, autthentically rockin'.

Essential links:

Paul Five: Website | MySpace

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